Grants Awarded to Monash Arts Research

2016

ARC Centre of Excellence of Australian Biodiversity and Heritage

The ARC Centre of Excellence of Australian Biodiversity and Heritage will create a world-class interdisciplinary research programme to understand Australia’s unique biodiversity and heritage. The Centre will track the changes to Australia’s environment to examine the processes responsible for the changes and the lessons that can be used to continue to adapt to Australia’s changing environment. The Centre will support connections between the sciences and humanities and train future generations of researchers to deal with future global challenges and inform policy in an interdisciplinary context.

ARC Centre of Excellence

Monash node researchers: Bruno David; Lynette Russell; Ian McNiven
Monash Indigenous Centre
2017-2023

Wandering minds in sleep and wakefulness: Attention, consciousness, self

This project aims to develop a theory of mind wandering. A large portion of our conscious lives is spent mind wandering: attention periodically drifts away from current tasks, often without our noticing. This challenges the assumption that healthy adults are normally aware of and able to control their thought processes. This project will use cognitive neuroscience, sleep and dream research, and philosophy of mind to develop a theory of mind wandering across the sleep-wake cycle and an interdisciplinary methodology for its investigation. The anticipated outcome is understanding of spontaneous thought and its relationship to attention, consciousness and the self. This potentially throws new light on important issues relating to mental health and sleep disorders.

Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award

Jennifer Windt
Philosophy; SOPHIS; Focus Program Belief, Value, Mind
2017-19

Greek drama in ancient Italy

This project aims to reconstruct how ancient Italian communities – Greek colonies, indigenous populations and Rome – appropriated Greek drama, made it part of their cultural heritage and drew upon it to create their own forms of drama. The project will document and analyse how Greek plays became a shared cultural product despite racial, social and linguistic barriers, to illuminate the significance and effect of cross-cultural exchange in antiquity. The analysis of cultural negotiations in ancient Italy also aims to provide points for reflection on today’s debate on multiculturalism and globalisation.

Future Fellowship

Sebastiana Nervegna
SOPHIS
2016-2020

Claiming possession: Asia, Europe and empire

This project aims to reassess the nature of claims to possession across the early modern world. Claiming created the borders we take for granted and its legal artefacts are everywhere evident. Claiming was never only a European enterprise, and Asia was and remains an active site for claiming. The project will examine how Europeans claimed possession over people, lands and resources in the shadow of powerful Asian states and charts the emergence of local counterclaims and processes of legal resistance. The research will also analyse Asian polities’ historical claiming practices across borderland areas. This project could show how practices developed in the early modern period influence current sovereignty disputes in the South and East China Seas.

Future Fellowship

Adam Clulow
History, SOPHIS
2016-2020

The history of inebriation and reason from Plato to the Latin Middle Ages

This project aims to uncover the undetected but pervasive dichotomy between spiritual inebriation and physical drunkenness from antiquity to the Middle Ages. While Christian theologians, inspired by Plato, celebrated inebriation as a metaphor for a hyper-rational state in which the soul transcends the limitations of reason, Christian moralists, inspired by Stoic philosophy, condemned physical drunkenness as a fall from reason. The project will analyse the cultural and intellectual history of inebriation with the aim of changing appreciation of how medieval thinkers inherited and transformed pagan classical ideas about drinking. Inebriation provides a hitherto unexplored path to rewriting the history of reason, urging us to consider our culturally-ingrained reactions to drinking.

Future Fellowship

Evangelina Anagnostou-Laoutides
SOPHIS
2016-2020

Contemporary Indigenous relationships to rock art

This project aims to understand the roles and meanings of archaeological heritage in the lives of Indigenous people today. Archaeological investigations typically rely on objects, images and places as evidence of past human activity, but these “artefacts” could also tell us about present-day relationships between people and their archaeological heritage. The project will examine how Aboriginal people from the south-western Gulf of Carpentaria engage with rock art, one of the most visual aspects of the archaeological record. By focussing on the cultural re-working of relationships to rock art, this project aims to provide new understandings to inform national and Indigenous futures, and support progressive advancements in land and sea management.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Liam Brady; Amanda Kearney; John Bradley; Karen Steelman
Monash Indigenous Center
2017-19

Legal and ethical issues in the inheritable genetic modification of humans.

This project aims to investigate the legal and ethical implications of technologies that allow inheritable modifications of the human genome. The use of these technologies in human embryos is fast becoming an international reality, and this project aims to examine the implications for Australia. The project will clarify the legal status of inheritable genetic modification technologies in Australia, analyse the ethics of these new technologies, and, building on this, recommend regulatory reforms to guide Australia’s response to international scientific and legal developments. These reforms could improve the governance of these new technologies and guide their clinical adoption.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Catherine Mills; Karinne Ludlow; Robert Sparrow; Narelle Warren
SOPHIS; SoSS. Focus Program BioFutures; Focus Program Belief, Value, Mind
2017-19

Disaster, human suffering and colonial photography.

This project aims to investigate how photography shaped modern understandings of disaster. During the period modern European empires were at their most expansive, and they became increasingly interventionist in indigenous environments and societies. The project will use rich but largely neglected sources from colonial Indonesia (c.1840-1950) to study how images of human suffering in different disaster contexts have evolved since the invention of photography. Understanding how and why European expansion shaped modern ideas about disasters, and how photography has developed to communicate human suffering, is expected to benefit community and scholarly awareness of environmental disaster, war and their effects.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Susanne Protschky
History, SOPHIS
2017-19

Artisan mobility, innovation and the eighteenth-century Republic of Things.

This project aims to examine how movement across borders in eighteenth-century Europe and encounters between artisans from different backgrounds promoted technical innovation in the cities. Mobility to and from Paris suggests that the cosmopolitan city’s society and culture were as important as markets and institutions. The project will study male and female artisans, producers of manufactured goods in the eighteenth century, who played a vital but largely forgotten role in transferring applied knowledge between European centres. This project aims to provide a historical grounding for debates on links between cosmopolitanism, culture, and technical innovation in a globalising world.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

David Garrioch
History, SOPHIS
2017-19

Patients’ use of digital media

This project aims to determine how Australians use digital media and how this influences the development and availability of treatments and the sociocultural factors underlying this digital media use. Patients can use digital media to manage their own health, but this may result in patient harm and a loss of public confidence in the underlying science. The intended outcome is to gain insights into this recent and fast-growing sociological phenomenon, and provide a scientific basis for formulating public policy strategies to ensure that healthcare resources are used efficiently and cost-effectively.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Alan Petersen; Alison Anderson; Timothy Caulfield
SoSS; Focus Program BioFutures
2017-19

How expectations shape testing in healthcare

This project aims to understand the sociocultural processes underpinning optimism for the use of testing technologies in healthcare. Australians are using more tests, which increases healthcare costs. This project will use the Australian national cancer screening programmes and routine clinical practice as case studies to determine human decision-making traits in sociological terms. The project expects to increase understanding of the sociocultural factors that influence decision-making and behaviour in healthcare settings, and help formulate effective social and economic policies.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project
Alan Petersen; Diana Bowman
SoSS; Focus Program BioFutures

2017-19

Preventing intimate partner homicide

The project aims to develop a framework for an integrated whole systems preventive approach to intimate partner homicide – the most common type of violence against women worldwide and the leading cause of death amongst Australian women aged between 15 and 44. The project will review a decade of intimate partner homicides in Australia to identify points of intervention that might have prevented killings. This knowledge is intended to inform and help develop a more risk-sensitive preventive approach to intimate partner homicides in Australia and overseas, enhancing women’s security and preventing their deaths.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Jude McCulloch; Kate Fitz-Gibbon; JaneMaree Maher; Sandra Walklate
SoSS; Focus Program Gender and Family Violence: New Frameworks in Prevention
2017-19

Building the Australian response to the ‘superbugs’ crisis

This project aims to investigate the Australian public’s engagement with communications and media on antimicrobial resistance, examine the public’s trust in expert knowledge and study how the public enacts expert advice about antimicrobial drugs in everyday life. The resistance of common infections to antibiotics and other drugs (the ‘superbugs’ crisis) jeopardises health worldwide. The ‘superbugs’ crisis means that individuals and care givers need to use drugs as prescribed and reduce their expectations for drug treatments. Research findings are expected to underpin Australia’s public health policy and communications response to ‘superbugs’, improving national and international health outcomes.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Mark Davis; Andrea Whittaker; Mia Lindgren; Monika Djerf-Pierre; Paul Flowers
MFJ, SoSS
2017-19

Informal sanctions and bad social norms

This project aims to improve the understanding of informal sanctions to enforce compliance with social norms. Unlike most behavioural economics studies, this project examines norms leading to outcomes that are inefficient, unjust or cruel, such as honour-killings or parochial violence. This project develops experimental paradigms to study “bad” norms in the laboratory. It will investigate a setting in which co-operation is inefficient; the use of sanctions to segregate groups; and the emergence of honour norms and their implications. The project aspires to build a platform that can lead to effective policies against harmful social norms.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Toby Handfield John Thrasher
Philosophy, SOPHIS; Focus Program Belief, Value, Mind.
With colleagues from Economics, BUSECO Klaus Abbink; Lata Gangadharan, David Skarbek.
2017-19

Toward inclusive peace.

This project will investigate how peace agreements can advance women’s rights and participation after post-conflict and political transitions. It will examine the relationship between women’s presence in peacemaking processes, women’s rights and gender provisions in peace agreements, and women’s participation in post-conflict governance of countries with successful peace agreements. Women’s participation in peace processes makes a successful peace agreement likelier, but may not consolidate peace or lead to greater participation by women in the governance of the country. Anticipated outcomes are analysis of the relationship between peace processes and gender equality in conflict-affected societies; improved consular delivery of aid programmes in fragile states; and targeted air delivery that empowers women.

Australian Research Council Linkage Project

Jacqui True; Nicole George; Katrina Lee-Koo; Sara Davies; Barbara King; Sally Moyle
Politics and International Relations, SoSS, Focus Program Gender, Peace and Security.
2016-2018

 


2015

Measuring the mind: A framework for building a consciousness meter.

This project aims to develop a new framework for measuring consciousness. The lack of well-validated measures of consciousness is at the root of a methodological crisis in the science of consciousness. Drawing on work in the philosophy of science and mind, the project plans to investigate whether consciousness can be measured in the way that other natural properties can be measured. The results of this project may inform guidelines for the objective assessment of consciousness in the context of post-coma brain injury, anaesthesia, epileptic absence seizures, infancy and non-human animals.

Future Fellowship

Tim Bayne
Philosophy, SOPHIS
2016-2020

Sephardic Jews and the untold Mediterranean.

The objective of this project is to bring Sephardic Jewish traders and their networks into mainstream history of the late 18th and early 19th century Mediterranean region. In the Mediterranean, Christianity met Islam, imperial trajectories were tested and adapted, and national identities were formed in competition with others. Sephardic Jewish traders were central to these processes. This project seeks to create transformative narratives of the histories of imperialism, Jewish traders, and the Mediterranean: it links early-modern Sephardic Jewish networks with the place of Jews in colonial systems, and imperialism with the colonial world. In this way, it may deepen our understanding of the imperial stories behind recent globalisation.

Future Fellowship

Julie Kalman
History, SOPHIS
2016-2020

Development volunteering programs and the cultural history of foreign aid Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award

Development volunteering programmes and the cultural history of foreign aid. This project plans to examine the cultural history of foreign aid through the study of development volunteering programs in Australia, Britain and the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. By examining programs that attracted the public’s attention to foreign aid policy, it seeks to ascertain how mainstream ideas about development and the Third World developed and to trace the political impact of popular opinion on the foreign aid system. It is anticipated that this project will extend emerging scholarship on the cultural history of international affairs and expand our understanding of Australian perceptions of Asia.

Agnieszka Sobocinska
2016-18

Australindia: An environmental history of Australia, India and Empire

Between 1788 and 1901, India and the Australian colonies served as important laboratories for environmental ideas and practices that could be transferred across the Indian Ocean. This project will analyse the trajectory of this environmental traffic between India and Australia to reassess the development of colonial understandings of the Australian environment, and the interventions and aspirations that these understandings produced. Examining colonial Australia in terms of these imperial webs of environmental connections will broaden perspectives on Australian history and illuminate the ways in which the Australian environment continues to bear the legacies of empire.

Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award

Ruth Morgan
NCAS
2016-18

Cinema and the brain: Eisenstein-Vygotsky-Luria’s collaboration

This project will be the first systematic and interdisciplinary study of a unique intellectual collaboration between the revolutionary Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein, the founder of contemporary neuroscience Alexander Luria, and the cultural psychologist Lev Vygotsky. The research program that these three pioneers conducted from the 1920s until the 1940s addressed the neural basis and semiotics of screen aesthetics. This project will use this major collaboration as a paradigmatic case study, identifying crucial considerations and principles for successful interdisciplinary research on the relationship between the brain sciences, cinema theory and psychology in the digital age.

Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award

Julia Vassilieva
2016-18

Transforming Cultural Identity: Media flows between Australia and East Asia

The rise of East Asian media industries, estimated to be worth US$120 billion and reaching at least 2 billion consumers, is changing Australian media culture. While East Asian media reach in to Australian audiences via new media, Australian media industries are reaching out to Asia via transnational co-productions. This project examines these trends in media consumption and production to analyse impacts on the cultural identities of Australian audiences and media products. Through the innovative framework of minor transnationalism, it will evaluate Australia’s involvement in East Asian media circuits and produce a deeper understanding of the nation’s relationship with its region.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Koichi Iwabuchi; Francesca Martin; Audrey Yue; Olivia Khoo.
Monash Asia Institute
2016-18

Talking through touch: adapting sign languages for use by Deafblind people

People who are both Deaf and blind are at high risk of social isolation and often have only a limited number of people with whom they can communicate fluently. Those who were born deaf and lose vision as adults often use a tactile form of sign language, but how visual sign languages are modified for tactile delivery is poorly understood. Drawing on a corpus of conversational data from experienced tactile signers, the project will use conversation analysis to document and describe Tactile Australian Sign Language. This analysis aims to inform interpreter/ case worker training for working with Deafblind clients as well as making a significant contribution to our understanding of touch as a previously underexplored language modality.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Louisa Willoughby; Shimako Iwasaki; Howard Manns; Mayumi Bono; David McKee
LLCL
2016-18

Interrogating the music city: cultural economy & popular music in Melbourne

Melbourne is Australia’s premier ‘music city’, with popular music a key component of its contemporary identity and cultural economy. Drawing on a range of sources and disciplinary frameworks, this project is both a history of the pop and rock music scenes in Melbourne from the mid-1950s to the present, and an analysis and critique of the usefulness of the concept of the ‘music city’ to understanding the role of popular music in the cultural economy of cities internationally. As governments and civic leaders around the world increasingly look to music cultures as drivers of economic development and cultural status, the project offers a timely evaluation of the utility of this cultural and economic strategy.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Shane Homan; Seamus O’Hanlon; John Tebbutt; Catherine Strong
MFJ
2016-18

Revitalising the Musical Arts of Indonesia’s Lampung Province

Neglected Indigenous peoples are emerging around the world, raising questions about how to overcome their stigmatisation and lack of opportunity. This ethnographic project aims to document how and to what extent one Indigenous group in the post-Suharto era of regional autonomy in Indonesia is improving its status through affirmative political action based on its traditional musical arts, philosophy and Islamic beliefs. With a novel ethnomusicological methodology it will delineate the stylistic identity of their traditional, new and popular musical arts and youth culture, and will theorise about the changing meanings of culture and Islam among this marginalised people.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Margaret Kartomi; Bart Barendregt; Rina Martiara
Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music
2016-18

A social and cultural history of atrocity in warfare

A social and cultural history of atrocity in warfare. This project aims to investigate how and why atrocity in war is understood, questioned, and given meaning. It plans to focus on a pivotal historical moment in the conceptualisation of legitimate and excessive violence in war – the medieval crusades from c. 1095–1300 – to analyse how societies came to establish the limits of violence and why it was historically important for them to do so. The anticipated outcomes of the project are new understanding of how and why the medieval period was crucial in the formation of ideas about the boundaries of war; new insights into how concepts of atrocity become culturally and socially important; and expansion of Australia’s knowledge base in the history and conduct of war.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Megan Cassidy-Welch
2016-18

Australia’s Asian garrisons and regional engagement, 1945-1988

This project examines Australia’s overseas military communities, which saw over 100,000 Australian service personnel and their families reside in Japan, Malaysia, Singapore and Hong Kong between 1945 and 1988. By undertaking the first detailed analysis of these communities as major sites of cultural contact, the project seeks to integrate the experiences of service personnel, their families and host societies into the history of regional relationships. It is anticipated that the project will expand and reinterpret the history of Australia’s engagement with Asia, and extend the international scholarship on military bases, by focusing on the role of overseas garrisons in bilateral and regional relations.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Christina Twomey; Kevin Blackburn; Agnieszka Sobocinska; Ernest Koh; Matthew Augustine; Sean Brawley
History, Sophis; NCAS
2016-18

Place, Commonality and the Human: Towards a New Philosophical Anthropology

Combining historical and conceptual approaches, this project aims to develop a new philosophical anthropology that centers on understanding human being in terms of both place and commonality. This account will provide the basis for a rethought conception of the ethical that is bound to human life and that understands the ethical as essentially a matter of judgment rather than prescriptive rule. Given the centrality of the concept of the human to any thinking about our contemporary situation, the project will have both an applied and interdisciplinary relevance.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Andrew Benjamin; Jeffery Malpas
SOPHIS
2016-18

Social Futures & Life Pathways of Young People in Queensland: Waves 6 & 7

This project extends a large longitudinal study of young people in Queensland. It aims to investigate the impact of social, political and economic changes on educational, workforce, partnering, family and housing transitions in early adulthood. It enhances scholarly understanding and public policy formation in these domains by tracking stability and change in the values, aspirations, health and well-being of a cohort of young people who were first surveyed as secondary school students a decade earlier. The project combines large scale survey research with in-depth qualitative interviewing to assess how global uncertainty and social traditions, institutions and inequalities structure the life pathways of young people in Australia.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Zlatko Skrbis; Bruce Tranter; Cameron Parsell
Sociology, SoSS
2016-18

Consciousness in the Predictive Mind

The project aims to provide a unified approach to the nature of consciousness. Neuroscience and philosophy are still unable to explain how the brain gives rise to our conscious experience. Competing theories of consciousness are piecemeal, difficult to test and compare, and mostly formulated without much regard to a general theory of brain function. This project takes a different approach: it front-loads a new and influential general theory of brain function, and aims to use this theory to determine which theories of consciousness can be defended and which rejected. The anticipated outcome is a unified scientific and theoretical approach to consciousness, achieving a deeper and more integrated understanding of a major field of contemporary neuroscience and philosophy research.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

Jakob Hohwy; Sid Kouider; Anil Seth; Felix Blankenburg
Philosophy, SOPHIS; Focus Program Belief, Value, Mind
2016-18

Children as health advocates in families.

This project intends to examine how health knowledge taken home by primary-aged children affects children’s wellbeing, family food practices and family relationships. Widespread public concern with obesity means children can be seen as advocates for change in family health practices. The project plans to investigate the consequences for children and families of primary school healthy eating programs, with particular attention to diverse family groups. It plans to use a multimethod qualitative approach including video diaries and interviews with children and parents within families. Results are expected to inform school health and education policy practices and provide resources for those working on health issues with primary-school-aged children and families, to facilitate child and family wellbeing.

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

JaneMaree Maher; Janice Wright; Jo Lindsay; Claire Tanner; Deana Leahy
SoSS
2016-18

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Engagement is a main ambition of the Faculty of Arts. Engagement can take many forms. Partnerships can be formed in surprising ways. What we can deliver across many fields of research will impress. We are keen and prepared to form new collaborations.

Ways to Engage

The Arts Research Business Development Office provides research and professional support for the Faculty’s academic staff.

Telephone:  +61 3 990 58547
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Email: arts-research-enquiries@monash.edu

Arts Research Business Development Office, 3rd Floor West, Menzies Building, Clayton Campus

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